Testimonials 2005


Good Day, I have acquired my daughters Stiletto Finish hammer while she is out to sea working on a cruise ship. After my having wielded a Steel hammer for the last six years, the long heavy handle no longer hits the back of my knee, no longer strains my arm with exceeded force of driving one lonely nail. It is as though, the Stiletto does not exist, until its needed, and then, only with a minimum of energy. I have found that the FH10C has been excellent for hanging interior door jams, nailing them off with galvanized finishing nails. Its also good for tapping crown, casing and baseboards into place. I think in the very near future I will have to procure my very own Stiletto.
Best Wishes, Dave G.


Dear Sirs: I hope you have a few minutes to read a short story. Once upon a time (year 2001 AD) there was a carpenter who fell in love with Stiletto Hammers; so much so that he found that he could not live without one. When the first one broke he was devastated and had his wife run out and purchase him a new one. After she satisfied the carpenter, she mailed off the hammer to the company which they fixed and sent a $100 certificate towards the purchase of a new hammer. What a great company! She was surprised and immediately gave the carpenter the certificate to put in the job trailer and use the next time he had a chance (and then assumed he did so). Finally the time came for the carpenters wife to have her own new house, so in February 2002 most everything was packed up, put in storage and into a rental home she was tucked with her children. Meanwhile the carpenter purchased a few more Stilettos and one by one they succumbed to the relentless schedule of the carpenter. Because a carpenters house is the last item on a very busy list; it is now three (long) years later and the wife is finally unpacking and moving into the new house, when she spies none other than the $100 certificate. Imagine her surprise! When she confronted the carpenter with the unused certificate he claimed he had just forgotten all about the certificate because he had inadvertently packed it away. The story did not hold water with the carpenters wife because she knew that she did all the packing. It was obvious that he had not taken it to the job trailer like she had instructed, but left it in the books and papers that she had so carefully packed away. On a mission like no other, the carpenters wife rounded up the entire collection of broken Stilettos that the carpenter had tucked away here and there, (like a child tucks away favorite toys, or a dog buries bones) leaving him only the one he had in his pouch. She put them in a box, sat down at the computer and put the long story on paper, in hopes that someone at the Stiletto Co. would feel her pain and make a new certificate. Thank you for taking the time to read my story, enclosed are three more heads that need new handles (curved) and attached is that long lost certificate. All joking aside, everything above is true and factual. My husband uses no other hammer, you make a great product.
Kelly R


I just wanted to say thanks. I just received your new finish hammer.  It is awesome!!! Guess I will have to put that Steel hammer to rest now. I think that was the best thing for your company to do. The new design is much more practical and with the 14 1/2 handle it is so compact. This will be a very successful hammer. Now I am thinking about that Mini Ti-Bone. I like that one for those demo jobs. Indestructible! Good luck with the new line.
Kyle M.


My Stiletto is THE tool! I am a working General Contractor and work alone on most jobs including remodels, additions and repairs. Efficient work habits and staying active helps me keep check on 50 years of wear and tear in one form or another, Carpal Tunnel, Tendonitis, Rotator Cuff, Degenerative Discs, allowing me to continue to do the things I love to do, one of which is hands-on building. My latest and greatest addition to efficiency is my Stiletto. Swinging a standard weight hammer exhausts my arm in short fashion, rapidly reducing my accuracy and enjoyment. Since I started using a Stiletto Titanium 14 oz. framer a couple of months ago I have found I can drive nails faster and more accurately. Reduced arm fatigue is the ultimate benefit. The light weight and balance of the Stiletto allow me to put more force behind my swing for longer periods, minimizing wear and tear on my arm and back, and yes, brings the fun back into hitting nails. I wish I would have had a Stiletto from the very start of my building career and a heavy weighted hammer were a figment of my ego. A Stiletto Titanium Hammer is +10 in a 1-10 scale of hand tools and well worth the investment.
Cheers, Dave D.

I have been a carpenter for about 40 years. This is to tell you that I have been around through the evolution of many tools, including hammers. I have probably had a couple hundred hammers and probably own 20 or so now. Every tradesman that I know eventually gives in and admits that your hammers are much easier to swing all day, more accurate, and just plain better than the other clubs out there. I hand nail all my homes (except sheathing) and always have. We get a much better end result. Our homes are tighter, stronger and visually look better and my customers thank me for it. With the Stiletto hammers we can accomplish our task with less fatigue and more accuracy than with nail guns or for that matter any other hammer. I also own a Stiletto nail puller and love that too. Thanks for your tools and keep your research and development department going strong.
Sincerely, Dwight S.

I am a working carpenter and I wear my bags everyday. I have been through many hammers in my career of 30 years so far. I have had many a hammer simply give up and lose one of its claws from fatigue from striking forces. No tool has come close to the longevity this tool has, yet has been put through the same punishment all others received. You have a loyal customer in me and that is only due to your superior product. I do not hesitate for a second to espouse on the greatness of your product. Good luck in the future.
Douglas B.

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